A blog by our UCL placement student, Anne Carey

As a full-time MA Library and Information Studies student at UCL, I was assigned a work placement through our professional development module. I was so delighted to get started at Brunel University London, as I had requested special collections or academic library experience, and my perceptive course faculty found me the perfect place to do both.

The plan was to set me up three days a week with Katie Flanagan, the Special Collections Librarian, in Brunel Library Special Collections and two days a week with Joanne McPhie, the Academic Liaison Librarian for the Department of Life Sciences, who would introduce me to everyone in the main part of the library and show me the inner workings of the academic side of things. On my first day I felt so welcomed by everyone and that feeling continued for the entire two (and a bit) weeks.

That first week consisted of a lot of academic library experiences that were completely new to me. I was lucky enough to shadow people who had all kinds of roles that I had heard of but hadn’t seen in action before. I was so grateful for everyone to take time out of their day to talk me through all the different aspects of their jobs. I got a crash course on cataloguing with Symphony and the chance to see how the system is managed. I also got exposed to Scholarly Communications, which really opened my eyes to the sheer amount of time needed to keep the university repository, Open Access publishing, and REF compliance up and running. The Academic Liaison Librarians were another wonderful team I spent a lot of time with. I got to shadow teaching sessions, which were helpful as a librarian who may be in their shoes one day, and as an MA student myself! I also got to sit and talk through managing reading lists, book orders, and collection management. I even got to sit in on a vendor meeting and a few staff meetings, and that gave me a lot of insight into the day-to-day reality of the job.

On the second week, I got the chance to dive into Special Collections. I had a bit of experience in a similar collection before, but it was so nice to get another chance to work hands-on with special collections. Katie was great and guided me on rare books cataloguing and showed me some excellent resources. Their Burnett Archive of Working Class Autobiographies is amazing, and it was a lot of fun researching the blog post I wrote for International Nurses’ Day. It was a privilege to catalogue some of the published works in the collection as well. As the week went on, I got more confident cataloguing rare books and got some really great career advice from Katie and Joanne.

Katie and Alison, my placement co-ordinator, agreed I would come back for three days later in the month. In that time, I got more cataloguing under my belt and had some very interesting discussions on the in-and-outs of running a Special Collections library solo. After finishing up my final three days, I am so pleased with how much I learnt at Brunel University London. I am truly grateful for all the help and support from the lovely staff. It was such a wonderful experience and I am very sad to be going!

A huge thank you to everyone!

Posted on behalf of Anne Carey, UCL Library and Information Studies MA student

 

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International Nurses’ Day 2018

Blog post by Anne Carey, Special Collections placement student from UCL’s Dept of Information Studies.

Brunel Special Collections is joining in on the support for International Nurses’ Day. On 12 May, we celebrate the dedicated and passionate people who commit themselves to providing excellent health care service. This year the theme focuses on health as a human right, and through this healthcare should be accessible by all, no matter the location or the setting

As the nursing profession and healthcare services have grown, nurses have become an important part of the healthcare systems by providing support to colleagues and patients. It’s impossible to imagine healthcare without nurses, but the care people have received throughout history has not always been like it is now – and it is still difficult for some to access, either financially or physically.

Looking in the Collections

Looking back into the Burnett Archive of Working Class Autobiographies here in Brunel Special Collections, we can gain an insight into the way working class people accessed health care in England, Scotland, and Wales between 1790 and 1945. This massive timeline covers significant periods in British history, from the Victorian Era to WWII. Particularly around the mid-late 1800s nursing really came into its own. This was due to the influential work done by Florence Nightingale, which is why we celebrate International Nurses’ Day on her birthday each year!

Frith nursing
Around this time, an un-official nurse and midwife named Susan Mary Firth dedicated her life to caring for others. We are lucky enough to have her personal diary in the Burnett Archive. She kept this diary during her 30 year career, between 1912 and 1942. Though never fully qualified, Susan nursed dozens of people in her community back to health, delivered their babies, and mourned losses with them. Susan often travelled to the homes of those in need, and dedicated her time to their care. Once there, she would usually spend at least a month with each patient and sometimes up to a year. In the best of times, Susan would celebrate the birth of a healthy baby as if she were part of the family or celebrate someone’s return to good health. In worse times, she would stay and mourn the loss of her patient with their family and loved ones. Compassion and empathy for patients is a characteristic of nurses that continues to shine through, and this makes them such a valuable part of health care.

Susan’s patients knew that they could rely on her in a time of need, often calling on her in a time of distress and uncertainty. She continued to provide care to the members of her community, and embodied the fact that healthcare it should be accessible to all no matter the location or situation. While she lived in a very different time, Susan’s passion for her patients remains very much a part of nursing today.

Don’t forget to show your support for International Nurses’ Day on 12 May, 2018, and share your own story. #ThisNuse

If you’re interested in reading Susan’s diary or any of the other items in the collections, they can be found in the Burnett Archive of Working Class Autobiographies at Brunel University London Special Collections.

Shakespeare Week

This week we’re celebrating Shakespeare Week on campus with a variety of events and displays.

In the Eastern Gateway building you will find on display of books from Special Collections Shakespearean collections alongside elaborate costumes made for Sir Mark Rylance’s play I am Shakespeare. On this blog you will find images from books that didn’t make it into the display, and can also read previous blog posts about the collection.

Baconiana

Baconiana is the oldest book in Brunel Library’s collection, and featured as one of our 50 objects in 2016.

 

 

 

First Folio and Bendy

Here, our facsimile copy of Shakespeare’s First Folio is being read by our mascot, Bendy Brunel, as part of our blog post on How to use Special Collections.

 

 

 

Preserving our collections

A major part of our work in Special Collections is to ensure that our materials will still be available to future generations of scholars and visitors. Many of the objects we hold are made of sturdy stuff, our rare 18th century books will probably outlast us all, but other items such as our photographic collections are more fragile, and even stable materials can become vulnerable over decades. To this end we spend a lot of time making sure materials are stored in optimal conditions to extend their life and usefulness. This week we are participating in the ALA Preservation Week by celebrating all things preservation and giving you an insight into the activities we undertake. You might even pick up a few tips on how to preserve your own special items!

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Blue blinds and ultraviolet filters

Where and how you store different materials can have a big impact on their lifespan. We try to store collections in a space that has a consistent temperature and humidity all year round. This is because extremes of temperature and the presence of moisture in the air can induce a harmful reaction in different materials. For instance, paper can be vulnerable to mould in hot and wet conditions or older colour photographs can decay in high temperatures.

This year we have installed some rather snazzy blue blinds to prevent sunlight artificially warming our facility, with the addition of ultraviolet filters to prevent yellowing of paper and fading of inks. We also monitor the temperature and humidity of our collections with some basic digital indicators to give us a warning of problems.

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Digital temperature and humidity monitors

Additionally, we keep our eyes peeled for any pests such as silverfish that might take a fancy to our materials for food or accommodation. We use pest traps to monitor any nuisance visitors, and if we find any try to modify the environment to discourage their visits.

Other environmental factors should also be considered. This might include dust, or pollution if you live in a built up area. One way to mitigate these is to store

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Pest trap

materials in an enclosure like a box that will prevent light and particles from accessing the item. This is a simple way to preserve heirlooms or keepsakes, although you do have to check on them occasionally to make sure there is nothing happening inside the box itself.

Interestingly, a common way materials become damaged is just through poor handling. To try and minimise handling and stress we use book supports to cradle our printed materials when they are being viewed. We also add a protective layer of Melinex to items like photographs or paper to prevent them from being damaged by constant use. At home, something as simple as washing your hands before handling rare materials can limit environmental pollutants.

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Book rests to support texts

With these safeguards in place we hope our collections will be available for years to come.If you would like more information about Preservation week visit the ALA webpages for advice and insights.

Poetry and education

A blog post by Raphaëlle Goyeau, a student volunteer in Special Collections. Raphaëlle is a native French speaker who used poetry to help her learn English.

On 21 March, we are once more celebrating World Poetry Day. It happens that it is also, since 2016, Education Freedom day – an observance in honour of all free knowledge and educational software online. To celebrate both, let us introduce Bill Griffiths and share some of his legacy by learning a bit of Old English through his poetry translations.

The Battle of Maldon, and its beautifully bound version, tell us of the real 991 battle between Anglo-Saxon and Vikings – which does not end well for the Saxons. A large part of the poem has been lost, but what remains is now available in Modern English. Below, the original version next to Griffith’s one.

Het þa hyssa hwæne hors forlætan,   He-bade then warrior’s each horse to abandon

feor afysan, and forð gangan,             Far-away to drive  and forward to-march,

hicgan to handum and to hige godum.       To-think on hands  and on mind worthy,

Þa þæt Offan mæg  ærest onfunde,             When it Offa’s kinsman  first discovered

þæt se eorl nolde yrhðo geþolian,             That the earl would-not lack of spirit tolerate

he let him þa of handon  leofne fleogan    He allowed then from his wrists cherished to-fly

hafoc wið þæs holtes,  and to þære hilde stop;

Hawk towards the woods, And to the  battle advanced;

As you can see, several words can be used to identify where in the poem we are when looking at the translation. Other words can probably be translated through the context. Can you see what “gangan” means? What about “leofne” or “hilde”?

Phoenix

The Phoenix, on the other hand, was itself a translation when Griffiths made the Old English version into a modern alliterating text. It would be an adaptation of the Latin poem De Ave Phoenice, which tells us of the mythical Phoenix, resident of the Garden of Eden whose life cycle never ends. As in  Greek Mythology, the bird grows old, dies, but rises again from the ashes.  It appears first in the first verses at the beginning of the part two, here in Old English:

ðone wudu weardaþ                                           wundrum fæger

fugel feþrum strong,                                           se is fenix haten.

þær se anhaga                                                     eard bihealdeþ,

deormod drohtað;                                               næfre him deaþ sceþeð

on þam willwonge,                                              þenden woruld stondeþ.

And here, by Mr. Griffiths:
This is the FOREST GUARDED by a GLORIOUS BIRD
BEAUTIFUL, and brave of FEATHER “PHOENIX” is CALLED
It KEEPS its HOME HERE, in SOLITUDE
SWEETLY DWELLING; for DEATH never TOUCHES,
While TIME ENDURES that DELIGHTFUL SPOT

Some words can be more or less easily identified. For example, it seems logical that the Old English “Fenix” would have given us the modern “Phoenix”, and the modern “death” can be guessed by the shape of “deaþ”. Others, such as “anhaga”, can reaquire a dictionary, which would tell you that it means “solitary”, or “recluse”.
Having both texts in hand, could you guess the meaning of “haten”, “wudu” or “woruld”? Answers below!
From Battle of Maldon
Gangan: to go, here “to-march”
Leofne: dear, beloved, here “cherished”
Hilde: war, battle, here “battle”
From The Phoenix
Wudu – Wood, tree, here “forest”
Haten – named, here “called”
Woruld – cycle, eternity, long period of time, here simply “time”

You can find these texts and much more in our Bill Griffiths Archives

National Storytelling Week 2018

We celebrated National Storytelling Week in Special Collections between 27 January and 3 February 2018. Groups of students with an interest in creative writing were introduced to items from our collections as a source of inspiration, and encouraged to write a story for reading aloud with help and support from their tutor, Emma Filtness.

National Storytelling Week

The students sought inspiration from some of our unique and distinctive collections

Some of the items they looked at our highlighted in this post, and they also made extensive use of our Burnett Archive of Working Class Autobiographies.

Ladies Home Journal 1948 edited

Advertisement from Ladies Home Journal 1948

You can hear recordings of some of the students’ stories here:

Alex Bond

Sam Green

Colour Our Collections

ColouringAs we posted last week, this week is Colour Our Collections week! On the ground floor of the library you’ll find print outs of illustrations from Special Collections to colour in, plus some colouring pencils. We’d love to see the finished results – please tag us on Instagram (BrunelSpecColl) and Twitter (@BrunelSpecColl).

The pictures for colouring are also available from here:

Tunnel

Locomotive

Cartoons 1

Cartoons 2