Tag Archives: ladies home journal

National Storytelling Week 2018

We celebrated National Storytelling Week in Special Collections between 27 January and 3 February 2018. Groups of students with an interest in creative writing were introduced to items from our collections as a source of inspiration, and encouraged to write a story for reading aloud with help and support from their tutor, Emma Filtness.

National Storytelling Week

The students sought inspiration from some of our unique and distinctive collections

Some of the items they looked at our highlighted in this post, and they also made extensive use of our Burnett Archive of Working Class Autobiographies.

Ladies Home Journal 1948 edited

Advertisement from Ladies Home Journal 1948

You can hear recordings of some of the students’ stories here:

Alex Bond

Sam Green

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Happy Christmas from Special Collections

A reminder that Special Collections will be closed over the Christmas/New Year period, from 21 December 2017 to 2 January 2018 inclusive. We will be open from 3 January 2018.

In the meantime, enjoy a few festive images from our collections:

1870 Ill London News

Christmas festivities from the Illustrated London News in 1870

1940 Ladies Home Journal

Tempted by the gift ideas in the Ladies Home Journal from 1940?

Festive recipes

Or maybe some festive recipes? Also from the Ladies Home Journal in 1953

Santa's Cooky shop LHJ

What will your festive baking look like this year? Ladies Home Journal 1953

#LoveArchives

Friday’s #ExploreArchives theme is #LoveArchives

Valentines Day

Valentine’s Day from Ladies Home Journal

Love on the underground

Love on the underground, from our Channel Tunnel collection

Cox 1-194 courtship

Ruth Cox was 19 in 1909 and courted a friend of her brother’s with her father’s consent (Burnett Archive of Working Class Autobiographies 1:184)

Frisby 1-25- Valentine's day

Minnie Frisby describes Valentine’s Day in 1943 (Burnett Archive of Working Class Autobiographies 1:250)

Gold 2-321 courtship

Olive Gold describes being courted by a Canadian Mormon, Billie, despite being a Methodist (Burnett Archive of Working Class Autobiography 2:321)

Seymour 1-616 courtship

Arthur Seymour met his girlfriend, Ada, when he worked in a shop. She was only allowed to see him between 8 and 10pm.

#HairyArchives

Wednesday’s #ExploreArchives theme is #HairyArchives!

Shampoo duck

Archives Duck wonders which of the 3 Breck shampoos from the Ladies’ Home Journal would best suit his new beard.

King Lear beard

Bendy Brunel comparing beards with King Lear. Happens everyday in the archives.

Tegetoff

Portrait from Illustrated London News from Sept 1866, of Vice-Admiral Tegetoff, commander of Austrian fleet.

#EdibleArchives

Tuesday’s #ExploreArchives theme is #EdibleArchives

This book is a register kept as part of the standard records at Padstow station in Cornwall, from 1921 to 1952. As the port at Padstow sent out a great deal of fish, the station had a separate fish loading platform. This was closed in 1950s as the trade in fish declined. This website gives more details on the freight trains, including the dedicated fish service running to Nine Elms. Many of the entries are for fish or other foodstuffs, but there is also an entry for a corpse, sent in December 1940 to Stepps in North Lanarkshire: perhaps a fallen soldier? Kept in the pages for 1940 is a loose memo, written in pencil and dated 20th September 1940, concerning a delayed delivery and noting that “during the current emergency” (that is, during World War Two, owing to the disruption to rail services) the special charges for fish sent to London Waterloo would also apply to fish sent to Paddington.

Peas LHJ

Peas, egg and ham salad from Ladies Home Journal 1953

Stuffed meat LHJ

Ration-stretching stuffed meats from Ladies Home Journal 1943

Festive recipes

Started Christmas baking yet? Here’s the header for some festive recipes, from the Dec 1942 Ladies’ Home Journal

#ArchiveCatwalk

Monday’s #ExploreArchives theme is #ArchiveCatwalk

Matching PJs LHJ

Matching shirts ad from Ladies Home Journal

Downer 1-211 dressmaker

Mrs R Downer relates how she was a dressmaker to a famous, but unnamed, employer (Burnett Archive of Working Class Autobiographies 1:211)

Gold 2-321 Apprentice dressmaker

Olive Gold went to work as an apprentice dressmaker in 1910, aged 13, with no wage for the first year (Burnett Archive of Working Class Autobiographies 2:321)

Jordan 3-101 tailoress

Charlotte Jordan also worked as an apprentice tailoress, with no pay for the first six months (Burnett Archive of Working Class Autobiographies 3:101

50 0bjects 28: The Ladies Home Journal

A post by Graduate Trainee, Becky Tabrar

The Ladies Home Journal was an American monthly lifestyle magazine which was established in February 1883. By the turn of the century it was the leading women’s magazine in the US, and reached one million subscribers in 1903. Within our collection we hold editions spanning from 1939 to 1961, and studying the Journal allows us an insight into the attitudes and opinions of the time.

Persistent themes can be seen throughout the editions we hold; the most prominent of which is sexism. Advertisements frequently urge women to look their best for their husbands, as seen in an advert for Lady Esther cosmetics in the July 1939 edition, which states ‘the wrong shade of powder can turn the right man away’. Women are also advised on the best methods of keeping an orderly home. An Annual Report to Housewives, featured in the July 1961 edition, advertises the newest domestic appliances available, but exclusively addresses women. The article advises the reader to ‘ask a user what service she gets before you buy’; the assumption being that only women will ever use the domestic appliances. Moreover, adverts for domestic products universally feature women, and even when only a hand is shown, nail polish is used to ensure femininity is represented.

Another frequent theme is consumerism. Since the late 19th century, shopping had been changing from a functional role for women, to a leisured and respectable activity. Companies began to see women as the ‘chief purchasing power’ for households and the adverts seen in the Ladies Home Journal reflects this. In fact, the journal itself was enforcing the link between women and consumerism, which was further strengthen by technological inventions in the domestic sphere, allowing women to spend less time on the household and more time shopping. The most frequently advertised items in the Ladies Home Journal include new domestic appliances, make up products and cleaning products.

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However, apart from tracing overarching themes through the editions, we can also gain information on the reaction of the American public to specific historical events. An article in the July 1945 edition documents the shocked reaction of the American public to the discovery of extermination camps following the collapse of the Third Reich. It claims that a cynical world, which has lost morality, and is obsessed with power, was to blame, and urges the world to return to religion. Similarly, reactions to the signing of the United Nations Charter can be seen in the September 1945 edition, whereby an article surmises that the agreement signed at San Francisco will not eradicate greed, but ‘can keep the peace when the inevitable threats of war arise again’.

Though attitudes differ, the special features of the Journal are still recognisable in today’s magazines. Each month a novel segment was included, and Eleanor Roosevelt, like celebrities today, was a regular columnist, answering queries from financial woes to the most fashionable hairstyle. Similarly, interviews with Hollywood celebrities were a frequent trend, along with fashion segments. In later editions, ladies could receive advice from a medical column, and letters of readers were published within the magazine.

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