Monthly Archives: May 2018

A blog by our UCL placement student, Anne Carey

As a full-time MA Library and Information Studies student at UCL, I was assigned a work placement through our professional development module. I was so delighted to get started at Brunel University London, as I had requested special collections or academic library experience, and my perceptive course faculty found me the perfect place to do both.

The plan was to set me up three days a week with Katie Flanagan, the Special Collections Librarian, in Brunel Library Special Collections and two days a week with Joanne McPhie, the Academic Liaison Librarian for the Department of Life Sciences, who would introduce me to everyone in the main part of the library and show me the inner workings of the academic side of things. On my first day I felt so welcomed by everyone and that feeling continued for the entire two (and a bit) weeks.

That first week consisted of a lot of academic library experiences that were completely new to me. I was lucky enough to shadow people who had all kinds of roles that I had heard of but hadn’t seen in action before. I was so grateful for everyone to take time out of their day to talk me through all the different aspects of their jobs. I got a crash course on cataloguing with Symphony and the chance to see how the system is managed. I also got exposed to Scholarly Communications, which really opened my eyes to the sheer amount of time needed to keep the university repository, Open Access publishing, and REF compliance up and running. The Academic Liaison Librarians were another wonderful team I spent a lot of time with. I got to shadow teaching sessions, which were helpful as a librarian who may be in their shoes one day, and as an MA student myself! I also got to sit and talk through managing reading lists, book orders, and collection management. I even got to sit in on a vendor meeting and a few staff meetings, and that gave me a lot of insight into the day-to-day reality of the job.

On the second week, I got the chance to dive into Special Collections. I had a bit of experience in a similar collection before, but it was so nice to get another chance to work hands-on with special collections. Katie was great and guided me on rare books cataloguing and showed me some excellent resources. Their Burnett Archive of Working Class Autobiographies is amazing, and it was a lot of fun researching the blog post I wrote for International Nurses’ Day. It was a privilege to catalogue some of the published works in the collection as well. As the week went on, I got more confident cataloguing rare books and got some really great career advice from Katie and Joanne.

Katie and Alison, my placement co-ordinator, agreed I would come back for three days later in the month. In that time, I got more cataloguing under my belt and had some very interesting discussions on the in-and-outs of running a Special Collections library solo. After finishing up my final three days, I am so pleased with how much I learnt at Brunel University London. I am truly grateful for all the help and support from the lovely staff. It was such a wonderful experience and I am very sad to be going!

A huge thank you to everyone!

Posted on behalf of Anne Carey, UCL Library and Information Studies MA student

 

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International Nurses’ Day 2018

Blog post by Anne Carey, Special Collections placement student from UCL’s Dept of Information Studies.

Brunel Special Collections is joining in on the support for International Nurses’ Day. On 12 May, we celebrate the dedicated and passionate people who commit themselves to providing excellent health care service. This year the theme focuses on health as a human right, and through this healthcare should be accessible by all, no matter the location or the setting

As the nursing profession and healthcare services have grown, nurses have become an important part of the healthcare systems by providing support to colleagues and patients. It’s impossible to imagine healthcare without nurses, but the care people have received throughout history has not always been like it is now – and it is still difficult for some to access, either financially or physically.

Looking in the Collections

Looking back into the Burnett Archive of Working Class Autobiographies here in Brunel Special Collections, we can gain an insight into the way working class people accessed health care in England, Scotland, and Wales between 1790 and 1945. This massive timeline covers significant periods in British history, from the Victorian Era to WWII. Particularly around the mid-late 1800s nursing really came into its own. This was due to the influential work done by Florence Nightingale, which is why we celebrate International Nurses’ Day on her birthday each year!

Frith nursing
Around this time, an un-official nurse and midwife named Susan Mary Firth dedicated her life to caring for others. We are lucky enough to have her personal diary in the Burnett Archive. She kept this diary during her 30 year career, between 1912 and 1942. Though never fully qualified, Susan nursed dozens of people in her community back to health, delivered their babies, and mourned losses with them. Susan often travelled to the homes of those in need, and dedicated her time to their care. Once there, she would usually spend at least a month with each patient and sometimes up to a year. In the best of times, Susan would celebrate the birth of a healthy baby as if she were part of the family or celebrate someone’s return to good health. In worse times, she would stay and mourn the loss of her patient with their family and loved ones. Compassion and empathy for patients is a characteristic of nurses that continues to shine through, and this makes them such a valuable part of health care.

Susan’s patients knew that they could rely on her in a time of need, often calling on her in a time of distress and uncertainty. She continued to provide care to the members of her community, and embodied the fact that healthcare it should be accessible to all no matter the location or situation. While she lived in a very different time, Susan’s passion for her patients remains very much a part of nursing today.

Don’t forget to show your support for International Nurses’ Day on 12 May, 2018, and share your own story. #ThisNuse

If you’re interested in reading Susan’s diary or any of the other items in the collections, they can be found in the Burnett Archive of Working Class Autobiographies at Brunel University London Special Collections.